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Security

Biometrics bear a varied burden

13 April 2018
A passenger is screened with facial recognition technology at Miami International Airport. Source: Miami International Airport

Governments use biometrics to boost border protection, but there are also benefits for airports and airlines in terms of passenger processing and operational efficiency

Biometric solutions are being tested for their potential to bolster security at US airports and handle the increasing number of international travellers entering the country. According to the most recent 20-year traffic forecast from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), international passenger traffic to the United States will increase by 5% in 2018, and by 3.3% annually until 2038.InSight Duo installation at Gatwick Airport in the United Kingdom. (Tascent)InSight Duo installation at Gatwick Airport in the United Kingdom. (Tascent)

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is moving quickly towards a biometric-exit process at US airports that utilises facial recognition, and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) may also start using facial images.

Jane’s reported in January 2018 that several US airlines have supported pilot deployments under the CBP Biometric Exit programme, to test how facial recognition technology can identify outbound passengers at the boarding gate. Senior CBP official John Wagner has said he hopes to see a full rollout of Biometric Exit “in the next three to four years”.

Federal agencies such as CBP, the TSA, and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science & Technology (S&T) Directorate continue to eye other biometrics as possible security methods in the future. These can be integrated with facial recognition in a multimodal system.

US developers of multimodal biometrics include Tascent, which in 2017 introduced InSight Duo. The system blends iris and facial recognition for high-throughput enrollment, identification, and authentication and can also capture dual iris and face images in about two seconds, working at a standoff distance of 50 cm to 1 m.

DHS S&T has assessed biometric solutions at its Maryland Test Facility as part of its Apex Air Entry/Exit Re-Engineering program (known as AEER), which develops, tests, analyses, and assesses technology solutions. Elements of Apex AEER are now moving into the Homeland Security Research Projects Agency (HSARPA) Port of Entry – People Screening (POE-PS) programme.

See related article at: http://www.janesairport360.com/article/10237/sita-rolls-out-biometric-border-control-in-mexico

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To contact the author of this article, email Ben.Vogel@ihsmarkit.com


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