CONTENT PREVIEW
Security

Blast protection system avoids risk of glass debris

11 March 2019
Blast Guard from Pure Vista (pictured in late 2017 during ASIAD blast tests) is designed to prevent flying shards of glass from causing injuries. Source: Pure Vista

UK-based Pure Vista has developed a frameless balustrade system for glass panels that essentially remain in place, whether they are hit by bullets or blast waves.

Director Adam Oakes said that Pure Vista products have been earmarked for potential use in the refurbishment of Heathrow Terminal 4, and the company is also keen to participate in refurbishment work that will soon begin at Manchester Airport.

Oakes described how Pure Vista developed a product called Mega-Grip, a commercial glass balustrade converted into a blast guard by making new parts that secured the glass in place. Using commercial off-the-shelf glass, it was then tested for blast resistance as Blast Guard, described by the company as the first completely frameless bomb-resistant adjustable balustrade.

Blast Guard meets Aviation Security in Airport Development (ASIAD) design guidance from the Department for Transport, and it also complies with the ISO 16933:2007 standard for blast-resistant security glazing.

“In a blast, using our system, the glass will deflect under quite high pressures. It will then crack the inside base of the glass, which is a laminate,” he told Jane’s . “However, the outside panel, which is away from the actual exposure, will be retained in situ. That means the glass remains upright and stays in place so no debris is produced.”

Without the Pure Vista system, the entire glass panel would disintegrate and possibly cause casualties from flying fragments.

Although Blast Guard is slightly more expensive than a non-reinforced glass balustrade, Pure Vista kept costs down by using commercially available components. A clamp holds the glass under quite high pressure and around this two foam wedges are applied, into which a special resin is injected that stops any vibration working its way into the fitting and allowing the glass from working its way free. No handrail is required on the glass.

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