ATC

Raytheon-Hensoldt partnership to deliver first radar

03 May 2019
Matt Gilligan of Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services (left) and Erwin Paulus of Hensoldt, pictured at the 2019 World ATM Congress. The two companies are delivering their first joint system to an airbase in the Netherlands in May.

The Royal Netherlands Air Force is to receive the first joint radar system from Raytheon and Hensoldt for air traffic control and wind farm interference mitigation in May at De Kooy Airfield.

“We are delivering our first joint products,” Erwin Paulus, Hensoldt head of radar/identification friend or foe (IFF), confirmed to Jane’s . “We have the only, maybe unique, 3D capability. This enables us to detect targets 300–400 m above wind farms.”

The De Kooy installation will be followed by three systems for Deutsche Flugsicherung (DFS) in Germany to replace ageing radars, and Paulus added that three mobile units are due to be delivered to the UK later this year under the Ministry of Defence Marshall programme.

The ASR-NG 3D S-band radar for airport surveillance has been active for more than 12 months at the Hensoldt test facilities near Ulm in Germany, where it differentiates between wind farm clutter and airborne targets in flight tests. “We have proven we can deliver what we promise,” said Paulus. The Hensoldt solution is available with the latest-generation Condor MK3 monopulse secondary surveillance radar from Raytheon to provide a combined primary and secondary surveillance capability.

Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services vice-president Matt Gilligan told Jane’s that he expects further orders. “We complement each other’s products,” he said. Raytheon envisages applications for the Hensoldt passive radar system within its customer base, and it anticipates interest from the cross-agency team in the US that is managing the Spectrum Efficient National Surveillance Radar (SENSR) programme. “SENSR is going to comprise a lot of different sensor types,” Gilligan noted. “Some of Hensoldt’s products could be part of our solution.”

Raytheon announced a teaming agreement with Lockheed Martin in April. The programme aims to replace in-service air traffic control radars with fewer, more advanced multimission systems, thereby releasing parts of the wireless spectrum for commercial use.

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